This site provides useful practical information related to global and national weather observing practices and instruments, including independent equipment reviews.
You will find much of the background in my book The Weather Observer’s Handbook (published by Cambridge University Press), details of which can also be found on this site, together with useful links and downloads.

Stephen Burt
Author, The Weather Observer’s Handbook

A nation obsessed with the weather? Yes, certainly, but which nation?

 

Tip of The Day
Manual raingauges should have a round, deep funnel to minimize outsplash in heavy rain (shallow funnel gauges are not recommended) and should have a capacity sufficient to cope with at least a ‘1-in-100 year’ rainfall event – a minimum of 150 mm in the UK and 500 mm (20 inches) in most parts of the United States. The gauge must be paired with an appropriately calibrated glass measuring cylinder.
To obtain records of the timing and intensity of rainfall, one or more recording raingauges are often sited alongside the manual raingauge. The record from the manual gauge should be taken as the standard period total and sub-daily records (hourly totals, for instance) taken from the recording gauge adjusted to agree with the daily total taken from the manual gauge. The use of standalone recording gauges is not recommended when accurate or comparable rainfall totals are required.
Choosing a weather station. There are many different varieties of automatic weather stations (AWSs) available, and a huge range of different applications for them. To ensure any specific system satisfies any particular requirement, consider carefully, in advance of purchase, what are the main purposes for which it will be used, then consider and prioritize the features and benefits of suitable systems to choose the best solution from those available. Examples are given in The Weather Observer's Handbook.
Earth temperatures are normally quoted for a morning observation hour, although hourly values can easily be derived from logged electrical sensors. Hourly values provide useful insights into diurnal temperature variations below the earth’s surface.
An automatic weather station (AWS) does not have to be the first rung on the weather measurement ladder. Short of funds? Not sure whether you’ll keep the records going and don’t want to spend a lot until you have given it a few months? Not sure where to start? Different options are explored in The Weather Observer’s Handbook.