This site provides useful practical information related to global and national weather observing practices and instruments, including independent equipment reviews.
You will find much of the background in my new book The Weather Observer’s Handbook (Cambridge University Press, 2012), details of which can also be found on this site, together with useful links and downloads.

Stephen Burt
Author, The Weather Observer’s Handbook

A nation obsessed with the weather? Yes, certainly, but which nation?

 

Tip of The Day
Dry- and wet-bulb thermometers can easily be replicated using electrical sensors, although small capacitative humidity sensors have largely replaced the traditional dry- and wet-bulb psychrometer. Modern sensors are small, economical on power, more reliable at temperatures below freezing and datalogger-friendly.
The critical decision criteria for dataloggers are – choice of power supply, and battery backup capability: amount of memory: number and type of input options (‘ports’): and programmable capabilities, if any.
Making weather measurements, particularly using an automatic weather station (AWS), can quickly generate vast amounts of data and these can become unmanageable without some thought being given to how records are to be kept and used.
The choice of datalogger and automatic weather station (AWS) software is crucial to the effective operation of any AWS. Its specification will define the capabilities (or limitations) of the AWS, and the choice of unit should be given at least as much consideration as the choice of sensors.
An automatic weather station (AWS) does not have to be the first rung on the weather measurement ladder. Short of funds? Not sure whether you’ll keep the records going and don’t want to spend a lot until you have given it a few months? Not sure where to start? Different options are explored in The Weather Observer’s Handbook.